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Cats' Corners: the little HOUSE in the woods....
Where House is NEVER safe...
The More Things Change... Chapter TWENTY-SIX 
3rd-Jun-2007 12:01 pm
house wilson hospital
Summary:  Wilson is given an unexpected opportunity to prove his friendship to House.  This story is my own attempt to make sense of the unsettling disruption of the House-Wilson dynamic in Season 3, so mention is made of many of the S3 plotlines and character development.  House-Wilson-Cuddy angst, hurt/comfort, introspection--my usual gig.  ;)  x-posted
Rating:  PG

The previous chaptersCollapse )

Chapter Twenty-SixCollapse )
Thoughts 
3rd-Jun-2007 09:25 pm (UTC)
AHHAHAAH!!

What has Wilson done!!! OH NO!!!

Poor House! wow, you are a great educator! i have never heard of VRSA before!! i read your other stories before and i just LOVE you as an author!! GREAT STORY and i look forward to more!
3rd-Jun-2007 09:31 pm (UTC)
i look forward to more!

which i shall happily supply!! ;)
3rd-Jun-2007 11:32 pm (UTC)
oh fuck. you would think i would be used to your little surprises by now. but yet that last one just scared me into cardiac arrest. once again.

What had he done? He made a stupid and selfish decision to save his best friend, acting against said best friend's wishes. House will hate him for it when he wakes up and yet Wilson will not regret it. Never once. Cuz they're just that damn connected. When one goes the other will follow. Wilson I suppose just wasn't ready to die yet.

-ANimal
4th-Jun-2007 12:45 am (UTC)
When one goes the other will follow. Wilson I suppose just wasn't ready to die yet.

i do adore your twisted sense of humor, m'dear! and... uh... so sorry about the cardiac arrest; should make you feel better that i'm ACLS-certified, though! ;)

(and i'll be getting back to you tomorrow on that question you asked)
4th-Jun-2007 12:05 am (UTC)
Ooh, how excellent! The suspense and suspense in this story is always so skillfully done, and this chapter was no exception.
4th-Jun-2007 12:47 am (UTC)
it's a lot of fun trying to come up with ways to keep you kids interested, and coming back for more. this chapter was particularly... fun! ;)
4th-Jun-2007 12:23 am (UTC)
Wow, you sure are not letting up in intensity!! Wow!! It was a wonderful chapter in a freaky, serious and somewhat heartbreaking way. I liked that Wilson knows well enough that the dream is well, *real*! May be this is the way for him to deal with his actions and his conscious.

“What have I done?”

His actions will have consequences, but I do hope that House will realise the motives behind them. I also know that if the roles were switched, then House would have done the same thing for Wilson too.

Well done!!!
4th-Jun-2007 12:51 am (UTC)
I also know that if the roles were switched, then House would have done the same thing for Wilson too.

i think you're right. and ya know what? oddly enough, i don't think house would have anywhere near the sense of conflict about it that wilson does. i can just hear house now; "He's a moron; didn't know what he was talking about--let's save him; I'll be sure and tell him later how stupid he is."
4th-Jun-2007 12:26 am (UTC)
Goodness. That was, heart wrenching. The conversation was so real and voiced concerns which should have been dealt with on screen, and should have been said. You have me hooked on this story, it's wonderful. Something I didn't say in the chapter before - the comment about House having the lives of a cat, that was like a kick to the stomach. It was just believable. Your characterisation is fantastic, from the caring Wilson to the objective Foreman (oh, and I loved that line earlier on where Wilson was attempting to check House and his objectivity left as soon as he saw his face), the obedient Chase and the quite pragmatic Cuddy. It's just a joy to read. Or rather, as the story is not in itself joyful but painful, the characters don't jar with the canon.

(Oh I think there's some formatting error in the section with the Killer Tomatoes, it's bigger than the surrounding text)
4th-Jun-2007 12:57 am (UTC)
The conversation was so real and voiced concerns which should have been dealt with on screen, and should have been said.

i've grown fond of calling this story my own personal Season Three Recovery Program, because all the things you've mentioned that were missing from the show in S3 had really stolen much of my joy in watching it--so i'm trying very hard to fix that!

formatting error in the section with the Killer Tomatoes

thank you! everything on my screen was the same size, but after you mentioned the problem i checked out the html on that section, and sure enough--different size font. fixed now--thanx!

4th-Jun-2007 03:10 am (UTC) - Wow.
Just...damn.
4th-Jun-2007 03:15 am (UTC) - Re: Wow.
welcome jeffrey! and, uh... next time try to say a little less, okay? you're monopolizing the conversation! ;)
4th-Jun-2007 03:57 am (UTC) - DNRs
Putting aside for a moment the literary brilliance that was revealed at the end of the chapter, it struck a nerve and brought up conversations that my wife and I had years ago about our wishes and intent regarding resuscitation if we were in a hopeless medical situation. Our perspectives were very different. She would rather die than be in a vegetative state, and I would choose not to give up under any circumstance that I could imagine.

Her job in carrying out my wishes would be much easier than mine if she were the one incapacitated, and I have often wondered whether I could execute the decision to end her life. She wondered about (and doubted) it, as well, and even considered naming her mother or one of her sisters as her proxy instead of me. She unconsidered it after I explained how dangerous it would be for them to be put in that position. While I wasn't sure I could end her life, I had no doubt about my willingness to use deadly force to prevent anyone else from doing so.

Our resolution to the problem was to express our wishes in such a way that the decisions of our proxy, each other, would override any written advance directives, and our advance directives, as specific instructions, only had force if our proxy was also incapacitated. I would like to think that I would have the courage to do what was best for her, rather than what was best for me, but I'd prefer to just die first and not have to find out what I would do.
4th-Jun-2007 10:11 am (UTC) - Re: DNRs
you make some interesting points, jeff. and people should realize that DNRs and Advance Directives aren't always the same thing. a Do Not Resuscitate order means exactly that; if the patient's condition is such that they will die if immediate 'heroic measures' aren't instituted, and they, or their proxy, has signed a DNR, then the patient is allowed to die. with an Advance Directive, however, you (or your proxy) spells out exactly what can and cannot be done.

for example, i took care of a child in a vegetative state, in the home setting. the Advance Directive set up by his grandparents specified that if he were to stop breathing, we could use emergency measures up to, and including, CPR, an ambu bag, and necessary medications--but under no circumstances were we to intubate; hence no vent.

in this story, what i did was create a schiavo type situation. house doesn't have, nor did he want, a DNR. his verbal advance directive to chase specified that in the case of multiple organ failure, he didn't want his life artificially prolonged. legally, what house did was left everyone in a gray area. chase could argue in front of a medical ethics comittee that placing house on the vent would artificially prolong his life, thus violating house's expressed wishes, and chase would likely prevail. however, wilson could argue in front of a judge that house was placed on a vent to prevent multiple organ failure (renal/respiratory) and wilson would likely win.

when medical personnel must rely on substituted judgement, the waters muddy very quickly, as happened in the schiavo case. neither what chase wanted to do nor what wilson ultimately did was wrong, in terms of what little house had specified, actually. which is why it's essential that an Advance Directive be very specific. in some states (florida is among them) an Advance Directive, signed on admission to the hospital by the patient, will usually override any life-ending decision made by the legally designated proxy. a gray area, indeed.

it's my fervent hope that none of us ever find ourselves in such a situation.
4th-Jun-2007 01:40 pm (UTC)
Seriously best chapter yet. So many great things about it. It seems like a realist reaction House would have to waking up on a vent. The "everybody lies" line was the perfect dig and I believe that it will truly be the last thing House ever says.
4th-Jun-2007 01:54 pm (UTC)
The "everybody lies" line was the perfect dig and I believe that it will truly be the last thing House ever says.

yes--it would be a fitting epitaph for him, wouldn't it? i've been having an interesting experience lately; i ordered one of those "everybody lies" t-shirts, and on both occasions that i've worn it, i've had strangers come up to me to say, "i don't!" and i feel like saying, "uh... you just did." because we all lie--for the right reasons, the wrong reasons, sometimes for no discernable reason at all. no truer words were ever spoken than "everybody lies." now that's honesty, in its purest form!
4th-Jun-2007 01:57 pm (UTC)
Oh, Christ, that was intense. You really had me going. I've had that kind of guilt dream myself, and I was completely empathising with Wilson all the way through it. I'd be interested to see how House actually reacts.
4th-Jun-2007 02:02 pm (UTC)
i'm giggling; your icon is just perfect for wilson right now! glad you enjoyed the chapter, and thanks for the laugh (at poor frightened, guilty wilson's expense!)
5th-Jun-2007 09:44 pm (UTC)
Wow. That was some serious dream. I've had just that kind myself, and it's great to wake up from them, but poor Wilson, that dream isn't so far from his reality. And *that* is what I like about this fic. Grim, yes, but for a reason. I have to go with Nietzsche here: suffering makes one stronger. (But I stop going with Nietzsche after that. Suffering shouldn't be endless.)
5th-Jun-2007 10:05 pm (UTC)
Grim, yes, but for a reason. I have to go with Nietzsche here: suffering makes one stronger. (But I stop going with Nietzsche after that. Suffering shouldn't be endless.)

but but but... without endless suffering for house and/or wilson, where is the angst? our suffering shouldn't be endless (note to 'house' script writers: S3 did, in fact, qualify as suffering endlessly for many of us, and that's just... wrong) but once house and wilson stop suffering and start living a generally happy, routine, peaceful existence, there goes our material for fanfic! we're probably pretty safe there, however, as it seems those two are doomed to, at minimum, lead 'lives of quiet desperation,' no? ;)
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